Compilation of ICT Standards

12 Jul

Compilation of ICT Standards

As per request from a colleague in the accessibility space, I have compiled below ICT standards. If something is missing, please add via comments and will be happy to add them to my list.

  1. WCAG Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) is developed through the W3C process in cooperation with individuals and organizations around the world, with a goal of proving a single shared standard for web content accessibility that meets the needs of individuals, organizations, and governments internationally. Currently recommendation is WCAG 2.0 and a public working draft of WCAG 2.1 has been published in February 2017. https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag
  2. ATAG Authoring tools are software and services that “authors” (web developers, designers, writers, etc.) use to produce web content (static web pages, dynamic web applications, etc.). Examples of authoring tools are listed below under “Who ATAG is for“. https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/atag
  3. UAAG The User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) documents explain how to make user agents accessible to people with disabilities. User agents include browsers, browser extensions, media players, readers and other applications that render web content. Some accessibility needs are better met in the browser than in the web content, such as text customization, preferences, and user interface accessibility. A user agent that follows UAAG 2.0 will improve accessibility through its own user interface and its ability to communicate with other technologies, including assistive technologies (software that some people with disabilities use to meet their requirements). All users, not just users with disabilities, will benefit from user agents that follow UAAG 2.0. https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/uaag
  4. WAI – ARIA WAI-ARIA, the Accessible Rich Internet Applications Suite, defines a way to make Web content and Web applications more accessible to people with disabilities. It especially helps with dynamic content and advanced user interface controls developed with Ajax, HTML, JavaScript, and related technologies. Currently certain functionality used in Web sites is not available to some users with disabilities, especially people who rely on screen readers and people who cannot use a mouse. WAI-ARIA addresses these accessibility challenges, for example, by defining new ways for functionality to be provided to assistive technology. With WAI-ARIA, developers can make advanced Web applications accessible and usable to people with disabilities. https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/aria
  5. IndieUI https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/indieui
  6. New Section 508 of Rehabilitations Act (US) On January 18, 2017 the Access Board issued a final rule that updates accessibility requirements for information and communication technology (ICT) in the federal sector covered by Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. The rule also refreshes guidelines for telecommunications equipment subject to Section 255 of the Communications Act. The rule jointly updates and reorganizes the Section 508 standards and Section 255 guidelines in response to market trends and innovations, such as the convergence of technologies. The refresh also harmonizes these requirements with other guidelines and standards both in the U.S. and abroad, including standards issued by the European Commission and with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), a globally recognized voluntary consensus standard for web content and ICT. In fact, the rule references Level A and Level AA Success Criteria and Conformance Requirements in WCAG 2.0 (link is external) and applies them not only to websites, but also to electronic documents and software. For more information, the Access Board has published an Overview of the Final Rule. Over the next several months, the US Access Board, in partnership with the General Services Administration, will provide guidance on the standards and on how to implement them within the federal government. This guidance will be published on the Section508.gov website when available. https://section508.gov/content/learn/laws-and-policies
  7. Article 9 of UNCRPD To enable persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully in all aspects of life, States Parties shall take appropriate measures to ensure to persons with disabilities access, on an equal basis with others, to the physical environment, to transportation, to information and communications, including information and communications technologies and systems, and to other facilities and services open or provided to the public, both in urban and in rural areas. https://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-with-disabilities/article-9-accessibility.html
  8. ePub 3 Guidelines: This guide is a complement the EPUB Accessibility specification and techniques. It provides additional explanation of accessible markup practices primarily to help publishers understand the requirements to meet WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.3.1. Other topics, such as scripted interactivity and media overlays are also covered. https://idpf.github.io/a11y-guidelines/
  9. Accessible ICT Procurement Standard, Australia The Australian Public Service is committed to employing people with disability and creating inclusive work environments that reflect the diversity of the Australian community. To do so we need to ensure the ICT goods and services we buy are accessible for all employees.  https://www.finance.gov.au/blog/2016/09/09/Accessibility-ICT-Procurement-Standard/
  10. European ICT Accessibility Procurement Standard http://mandate376.standards.eu/standard
  11. US: Buy Accessible ICT Agencies are responsible for Section 508 compliance when they acquire ICT products and services. This is generally a shared responsibility between the Requiring Authority and the Contracting Office throughout the acquisition process. Appropriate Section 508 compliance depends upon the particular procurement method and acquisition procedures. https://www.section508.gov/content/buy
  12. Accessible Technology – a nice article on PEAT Works https://www.peatworks.org/content/accessible-technology-it-starts-procurement
  13. Mobile Accessibility “Mobile accessibility” refers to making websites and applications more accessible to people with disabilities when they are using mobile phones and other devices. WAI’s work in this area addresses accessibility issues of people using a broad range of devices to interact with the web: phones, tablets, TVs, and more. https://www.w3.org/WAI/mobile/

 

BySrinivasu Chakravarthula

Srinivasu is an Accessibility evangelist with about 13 years of experience in the industry. That experience has developed Srinivasu to treat Accessibility not just his day job, but something close to his heart.

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